Deer shot and killed in downtown Waterville

On Oct. 26, many students heading to the Alfond Commons were shocked to find an injured deer running toward the side of the building. Students on the shuttle and around Main Street witnessed the bleeding deer repeatedly run into the outer walls of the apartments. Mira DiSilvestro `21, a resident of the downtown apartments and witness of the incident described the event in a recent interview with the Echo

“I was in the shuttle and it was pretty full,” DiSilvestro said, “It was a Saturday morning I think, and the shuttle driver said, ‘Oh my god,’ and pointed to the deer that was running from the concourse near Pagoda Express down into the courtyard near the downtown apartments. The deer just started ramming into the windows near the civic engagement office, near the door where you enter the building. There’s also stairs outside that go down into the building and it fell down the stairs. It was just stuck down there and it kept ramming into the windows and the walls. It was also bleeding, so I thought maybe it got hit by a car.”

The extremely agitated and confused deer caused many students at the scene to feel unsafe. Many ran or hid from the deer while waiting for the authorities to arrive.

“Some of the students who were walking by, the shuttle driver had them get onto the shuttle because they didn’t know what was wrong with the deer and if it was going to get aggressive or anything,” DiSilvestro said. “And we watched it play out for maybe ten or 15 minutes. Then a van came by with lights on the top so we assumed it was animal control. They ended up getting the deer out of the area.”

When the police arrived the deer was reportedly shot and killed. Allegedly, some civilians in the area were able to take home the body of the deer to eat.

“I felt really bad for it,” DiSilvestro said. “I heard a ton of stories about other animals in downtown. And usually if they can’t get it out, they just have to shoot it because there’s no way for it to find its way back where it’s supposed to be, which is sad.”

Not all students shared the same feelings as DiSilvestro. Many decided to film the event and even shared it with other members of the campus.

“A lot of people on the shuttle were taking videos of it,” DiSilvestro said. “It was definitely a divide on the shuttle because there were a lot of people saying, ‘Wow, this is really sad. I can’t believe that,’ and we felt bad. And a lot of other people were just taking videos and laughing and didn’t really care.”